The Internet of Water for Cities

The Internet of Water for Cities

In this guest blog, Michael Young and Vianey Rueda discuss the importance of and need for cities to modernize water data. Using stakeholder engagement to incorporate local knowledge, the partners in this project in Boerne, TX, gained important perspectives, ideas, and approaches to inform the creation of the Internet of Water’s first municipal water data hub.

SensorThings API

This webinar introduces SensorThings API, an open standard for data providers to publish interoperable data, and data users to build workflows and applications built on standard interfaces applicable across all implementing data providers. You will learn about how to use the API to get data, including from several example data providers. You will also learn how to set up your own.

Open Data Policies

Open Data Policies

Water data have an enormous potential to enhance sustainability, improve management, and inform decision-making when they are freely available and easily accessible. “Open data”, as it’s called, is especially useful when it is consolidated in a single, open platform or data hub from which data can easily be searched, downloaded, republished, and otherwise utilized as needed.

The Water Reporter App: Data Management for Community Science Groups

Community Science groups collect a wealth of data on water quality that can be leveraged to improve management of water resources. John Dawes, executive director of The Commons, will present the Water Reporter app, which provides local monitoring programs with streamlined data management, visualization, and export capabilities to official databases.

Weather Data Extraction Tools: NCSCO Cardinal Tool

Extracting water data from large databases is too often overly complicated and burdensome. The North Carolina State Climate Office’s new extraction and visualization tools – Station Scout and Cardinal – make weather data extraction and exploration easier than ever before. Dr. Kathie Dello will present these new tools and discuss the process that went into their development.

Linking Data to the Wider Hyrdographic Network

Linking data to the wider hydrographic network is a key component of making water data more discoverable and more easily accessible. Dave Blodgett, a hydro informatics specialist at USGS, will describe how the Hydro Network-Linked Data Index (NLDI) connects data to the National Hydrography Dataset so that relationships between single monitoring locations and the broader water world can be revealed.

The Water Data Exchange Project (WaDE)

Sharing water data will enable us to more sustainably manage our most precious resource. Adel Abdallah and Ryan James of the Western States Water Council will present on the Water Data Exchange (WaDE) project, a framework and interactive dashboard for member states to share important water supply, water use, and water administration datasets.

Data Fragmentation

Data Fragmentation

Cassidy White discusses data fragmentation and the challenges it creates for modern water management, and lays out 7 key benefits to data integration. “Seemingly everywhere and nowhere at once, water data may be widespread but is often difficult to find or is completely inaccessible…”

Water Data for COVID Pt. 2

As we learn more about the potential of wastewater surveillance for early warning of COVID, many states are grappling with how to transform their current water data infrastructure to ensure effective and efficient data management around wastewater surveillance. This webinar will feature a presentation on the CDC’s DCIPHER system as well as a panel with participants from Wisconsin, California, the CDC, and the Internet of Water.

Water Data 101

Water Data 101

With access to the water data they need, water leaders and decision-makers can implement sustainability measures and improved management strategies to ensure water is available to meet the needs of a changing and growing society.

Reflections

Reflections

We find ourselves – at a personal, organizational, and cultural level – asking ourselves how did we get here? And, where are we going? These are important, shaping questions that I hope we can all pause and ponder for ourselves.

Lucas Stephens

Lucas Stephens

Lucas Stephens Policy Associate E: lucas.stephens@duke.edu Lucas Stephens is a Policy Associate for the Water Policy Program and the Internet of Water. Lucas leads the Internet of Water’s policy program, educating lawmakers and decision-makers about the benefits of...

Data for COVID: Wastewater Surveillance

As we learn more about the potential of wastewater surveillance for early warning of COVID, many states are grappling with how to transform their current water data infrastructure to ensure effective and efficient data management around wastewater surveillance. In this webinar, participants will hear about the efforts of partners from California, New York, and Utah, their challenges, lessons learned, and successes. This is the first in what we hope to be a series of conversations about wastewater surveillance data management.

New Mexico Water Data Initiative

In 2019 New Mexico passed the New Mexico Water Data Act, prompting the creation of the New Mexico Water Data Initiative (NMWDI). In this webinar, Stacy Timmons from the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources will talk about the NMWDI from policy to implementation.

Creating Partnerships: the IoW P2P Network

Interested to learn more about the IoW P2P Network? What is it? How can you get involved? And why it is important that you do!

The IoW Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Network is a community of practice designed to connect members from across the nation who are working on modernizing their agency’s water data infrastructure. Active employees of state, local, or tribal government agencies, along with employees of water utilities and river basin commissions are invited to participate!