Spotlighting USDA-NRCS’s RESTful API: Accessing Data in the Air and Water Database

Spotlighting USDA-NRCS’s RESTful API: Accessing Data in the Air and Water Database

Discover how the NRCS has made accessing a wealth of air and water data simpler for the general public and developers. With the introduction of new RESTful API methods, in addition to tools like SOAP Webservice, Air, Water & Soil Plots, a Report Generator, and more, finding critical climate data is more streamlined than ever. We’ll cover the suite of products and tools the NRCS uses to support access to critical climate and water data.

Journey of the NLDI: Past, Present, Python, and Beyond

Journey of the NLDI: Past, Present, Python, and Beyond

Discover the Network Linked Data Index (NLDI)—a search engine that indexes data to a river network —and its applications for data producers, application developers, data analysts, and modelers.  A vital component of several USGS web systems as well as the growing index of data in Geoconnex (the Internet of Water’s core technology), the NLDI has been key to unveiling relationships between single monitoring locations and the broader water world. Now, following a recent effort to convert the code base to Python to increase open-source accessibility, it’s set to make water data even more discoverable and easily accessible. Join this webinar to learn more about the NLDI’s past as a groundbreaking EPA and USGS collaboration, and its future, including the development of client applications in the USGS Monitoring Location pages and Water Quality Portal. The presentation will be targeted at both a technical and non-technical audience.

Getting to Know the Internet of Water Service Center

Getting to Know the Internet of Water Service Center

A founding member of the IoW team, Kyle Onda knows a thing or two about the lengths it takes to translate the IoW Principles into practice. His diverse background offers a unique perspective on the challenges and opportunities ahead. Now, in his new role as Director of the IoW at CGS, he is poised to advance the vision of modern water data infrastructure even further.

Great Lakes to Gulf: Data Visualizations and Tracking Nutrient Trends in the Mississippi River Basin

Great Lakes to Gulf: Data Visualizations and Tracking Nutrient Trends in the Mississippi River Basin

The Great Lakes to Gulf Virtual Observatory (GLTG) is an interactive, geospatial application that provides user-friendly access to water quality information from the Mississippi River and its tributaries. GLTG helps people visualize and better understand nutrient pollution and its historical evolution. From agricultural conservation practices to green infrastructure, to Nitrate Loading trends, there’s a wealth of information at your fingertips. We’ll walk you through the different layers and data available and then dive into lessons learned from our work on nutrient trends analysis in the Mississippi River Basin.

Geoconnex 101: The Water Data Fragmentation Solution

Geoconnex 101: The Water Data Fragmentation Solution

Join the Center for Geospatial Solutions to learn more about the Internet of Water’s flagship technology, Geoconnex. This revolutionary water data-specific search index links disjointed water data with structured metadata, enabling seamless organization and discovery of information by theme and location. Ultimately, Geoconnex will unlock a Google-like experience, helping save countless hours in water data searches for the benefit of water managers, researchers, and the public alike.  

Great Lakes to Gulf: Data Visualizations and Tracking Nutrient Trends in the Mississippi River Basin

Bringing Big Data to the Basin: Transforming Nutrient Tracking with The Great Lakes to Gulf Virtual Observatory

The Hypoxia Task Force, made up of the 12 mainstem Mississippi River states, works to improve water quality in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin. The Great Lakes to Gulf Virtual Observatory integrates water quality data with land use and conservation practices information, helping to track progress on nutrient loss reduction and guide decision-making.

The Texas Water Data Hub: Starting to Trot, Looking to Canter

The Texas Water Data Hub: Starting to Trot, Looking to Canter

When last we met, back in September 2021, the Texas Water Data Hub was truly in its infancy. Fast forward over a year and a half, and the beta version of the Texas Water Data Hub is out of the barn! Was it a smooth process to get to where we are? Well, no, not exactly. We’ve had a few obstacles pop up along our path, but we get back on the trail each time.

The Pacific Northwest Streamflow Data Landscape

The Pacific Northwest Streamflow Data Landscape

Streamflow data are critical for decision-makers from local to regional scales who are responsible for an array of topics ranging from real-time water management to long-term water resources planning. Through this project we engaged a stakeholder advisory group to identify and compile critical streamflow monitoring metadata from 32 different organizations across the Pacific Northwest and created an interactive data visualization. We also distributed a survey to capture information about the organizations monitoring networks and quality assurance protocols and convened roundtable discussions in each state to gain additional insight into the challenges that organizations are facing and to identify priorities in regard to improved quality and accessibility of streamflow data.

Unlocking the Full Potential of Water Data: USGS and the Internet of Water

Unlocking the Full Potential of Water Data: USGS and the Internet of Water

The USGS is the world’s largest provider of in situ water data and supports the backbone systems for authoritative US water data. And yet, much of the country’s core water resources data are not managed by USGS. The Center for Geospatial Solutions is helping the USGS to address this gap by developing a widely accessible, comprehensive water data commons.

Western States Water Data Access and Analysis Tool (WestDAAT)

Western States Water Data Access and Analysis Tool (WestDAAT)

The Western States Water Council (WSWC) has completed the development of the first stage of the Western States Water Data Access and Analysis Tool (WestDAAT). WestDAAT will improve data visualization and streamline water data sharing for eighteen states in the western US. The new tool is the latest phase of the WSWC’s Water Data Exchange (WaDE) program, launched in 2011. WestDAAT encourages data sharing through a common system that improves access to and analysis of public water rights and water use data by providing this data in standardized, machine-readable formats. For the first time, WestDAAT provides access to information about surface water and groundwater prior-appropriation rights, serving approximately 2.5 million users.

The IoW Technology Adoption Program in New Mexico

The IoW Technology Adoption Program in New Mexico

A culture of modern data management has begun to take hold in the water management community. Leaders in state agencies across the country are beginning to recognize that better water data infrastructure helps them to be more effective and efficient in managing their water resources. The path to reach this goal, however, is still often unclear.